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Christina Coffee
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Posts: 13

Joy at May 1, 2011 at 12:17 PM

Joy Kuhaneck:

The main discrepancies a humanistic psychologist would have with a psychoanalytic psychologist would be the matter of conscious and unconscious thought. The humanistic approach focuses just on the patients current conscious feelings and having the patient take on the responsibility for personal growth, self-actualization. On the other hand the psychoanalytic psychologist focuses on unconscious urges and tries to make the patient recognize these urges, which often come from past traumatic events. The main problem a cognitive therapist would have with a behavioral therapist is that the behavioral therapist doesn’t look at the underlying cause of how the patient acts and just temporarily fixes the behavior by not taking into account the cognitive processes of the patient. If a person as suffering from an anxiety disorder I think that an eclectic approach therapy would be best. The eclectic approach is a therapy in which, depending on the persons problems, techniques are used from various forms of therapy.

 

Christina Coffee Per. 4

 

Firstly I want to say, wow, I wish I had been able to sum up my original post as well as that. Also the unconscious and conscious points with the different types of psychology were awesome; I wish I brought up in my post. It honestly really helped me better understand the differences between the two, and the AP review session yesterday made me open my eyes to the key words to each type of perspectives which I wish I understood better when I wrote the first response. I feel the same way with the second portion of your paragraph  with the behavioris tnot paying attention to the mental portion of the patient and only focusing on the observable behavior. Great job!

 

 


May 1, 2011 at 12:55 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Nevada Gellermann
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Posts: 12

Humanistic therapy is almost completely different than psychoanalytic therapies. While a humanistic approach seeks to fix discrepancies between ones self and their ideal self.  The psychoanalytic approach seeks to solve psychological disorders by sourcing it to childhood trauma that had been shoved into the unconscious.  Cognitive therapists often criticize the approach of behavior therapists because it may treat the symptoms of a psychological disorder but does not actually fix the underlying problem. Cognitive therapy seeks to change the way a patient thinks in order to treat the disorder and because of that, if successful, the patient is actually cured.  I tend to be a believer in the biological approach to treatment, although I think it is totally necessaryto couple it with therapy, I think the most effective way to treat anxiety is with an anti-anxiety regiment coupled with cognitive therapy( to attempt to actually fix the clients troublesome way of thinking).

 

May 1, 2011 at 6:44 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Briana Jamieson
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Posts: 4

Joy at May 1, 2011 at 12:17 PM

Joy Kuhaneck:

The main discrepancies a humanistic psychologist would have with a psychoanalytic psychologist would be the matter of conscious and unconscious thought. The humanistic approach focuses just on the patients current conscious feelings and having the patient take on the responsibility for personal growth, self-actualization. On the other hand the psychoanalytic psychologist focuses on unconscious urges and tries to make the patient recognize these urges, which often come from past traumatic events. The main problem a cognitive therapist would have with a behavioral therapist is that the behavioral therapist doesn’t look at the underlying cause of how the patient acts and just temporarily fixes the behavior by not taking into account the cognitive processes of the patient. If a person as suffering from an anxiety disorder I think that an eclectic approach therapy would be best. The eclectic approach is a therapy in which, depending on the persons problems, techniques are used from various forms of therapy.

I wrote the same thing but i didn't consider an eclectic approach therapy. Good thinking :)

May 1, 2011 at 6:49 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Nevada Gellermann
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Posts: 12

Alex Dulock at April 29, 2011 at 11:51 PM

A humanistic psychologist would most likely criticize a psychoanalytic psychologist for dwelling in the patient's past too much, causing the patient to view themselves as ill, and thus making them feel more hopeless with receiving treatment. Also, a humanistic psychologist might criticize a psychoanalyst by saying the psychoanalytic theory places too much emphasis on childhood, allowing the subject to not assume full responsibility for their actions, and thus not developing, meeting their full potential. Also a humanistic psychologist might criticize a psychoanalyst for dwelling too much in the unconscious, instead of the conscious, where the humanistic psychologist believes all the important development occurs.

A cognitive therapist would criticize a behavioral therapist for not changing the destructive and maladaptive thought patterns of the patient when treating their behaviors because, the cognitive psychologist would argue, if one does not treat the thought patterns, the behavior will occur again, because the behavior is a result of the thought processes. The cognitive psychologist would argue that the behaviorist treats the symptom not the disease.

For the phobic disorders, I think systematic desensitization would be the most effective in reducing the fear and stress associated with a certain experience/object for a person with a phobic disorder, because the gradual progression along with the relaxed state the patient is in (which helps because a person cannot be both simultaneously anxious and relaxed), enables the patient to calmly and coolly combat their fears in an effective way.

I dig the specificity you used in suggesting treatment. I definitely agree that for specific disorders treatment should vary. In fact, I believe that even differences in a case-by-case standpoint would drastically improve results in treatment. Although a disorder falls into a certain criteria found universally with that disorder, they are marginally different from person to person.

 

May 1, 2011 at 6:57 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stephen Gold
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Posts: 4

I suppose the one of the biggest issues a humanist would have with a psychoanalyst would envolve their focus. Psychoanalysts dwell on childhood, repressed memories, while humanists seem to focus on the current emotions of a client and their current situation. A humanist, it seems, would accuse a Freudian of focusing on defense mechanisms and childhood experiences as opposed to hepling them reach self actualizaton.

The rub between cognitive and behavioral stems from a basic conflict for all people: between what we do and say, and what we mean and think.Members of the cognitive school of thoght would accuse behavioralists of focusing solely on a subject's actions, never taking into account motivation, or underlying internal contradictions.This, in the eyes of a cognitive psychologist, could lead to misdiagnosis or false assumptions.

Personally, I feel that the most effective form of treatment is the cognitive approach. It allows discussion of the clients actual feelings, and can hence lead to true, permantent solutions.


May 1, 2011 at 7:21 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Stephen Gold
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Posts: 4

Nevada Gellermann at May 1, 2011 at 6:44 PM

Humanistic therapy is almost completely different than psychoanalytic therapies. While a humanistic approach seeks to fix discrepancies between ones self and their ideal self.  The psychoanalytic approach seeks to solve psychological disorders by sourcing it to childhood trauma that had been shoved into the unconscious.  Cognitive therapists often criticize the approach of behavior therapists because it may treat the symptoms of a psychological disorder but does not actually fix the underlying problem. Cognitive therapy seeks to change the way a patient thinks in order to treat the disorder and because of that, if successful, the patient is actually cured.  I tend to be a believer in the biological approach to treatment, although I think it is totally necessaryto couple it with therapy, I think the most effective way to treat anxiety is with an anti-anxiety regiment coupled with cognitive therapy( to attempt to actually fix the clients troublesome way of thinking).

 

I must say, I didn't originally give the biological perspective any thought untill I read your post...it seems to be one of the one's most people forget about...I think coupleing it with the cognitive therapy would allow, as you said, a regiment, in order to deter adverse emotions while getting to and fixing the problem. It didn't occur to me, but makes a lot more sense than just therapy..



May 1, 2011 at 7:26 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lanie Ogram
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Posts: 4

Lanie Ogram.

A humanistic psychologist would treat a client by focusing on the present and the future and on conscious thoughts. They would also promote one's health and growth rather than curing their illness. While a psychoanalytical psychologist would focus on the patient's unconcious thoughts and dreams and try to bring repressed feelings to conscious awareness. Cognitive therapists would treat disorders by reversing the clients' catastrophic beliefs about themselves, their situations and their furures. While a behaviorial therapist would view maladaptive symptoms as learned behaviors and try to replace them with constructive behaviors. I think if someone suffered from anxiety disorder, the best therapy would be psychoanalytical therapy because if they are able to understand the unconsciousness, they may be able to have a better chance in understanding the consciousness.

May 1, 2011 at 9:08 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lanie Ogram
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Posts: 4

Shelby Yant at April 25, 2011 at 7:44 PM

The main discrepancy that would exist between a Humanistic psychologist and a Psychoanalytical psychologist is a matter of conscious and unconscious thought. Psychoanalytical psychologists focus on unconscious urges and try to make the patient aware of the cause of the urge, often (according to these psychologists) coming from early childhood or any given traumatic event. The Humanistic approach focuses on conscious feelings and aims to help their patients in obtaining self-actualization, thus the patients take on the responsibility of personal growth.

Cognitive therapists would have a problem with a behavioral therapist because the behaviorists just look at the outside actions, not the thoughts behind "the mask".

I think the most affective therapy would be an eclectic approach, focusing on cognitive and psychoanalytical. This is because the two perspectives go hand in hand, and by deriving any therepeutic techniques from all perspectives, the patient has the best shot at recovery. 

I agree with everything you said and i love the eclectic approach idea! :)

May 1, 2011 at 9:14 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ed Jankowski
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Posts: 8

A humanistic psychologist would focus on the person's conscious feelings, and how to take resonsibility of an anxiety-causing situation.  He/she would use client-centered therapy and active listening to help a distressed person reach their full potential.  However, a psychoanalytic psychologist would be more focused on finding the problem by letting the client participate in free association; this gives a glimpse of the unconscious mind.  From there, the therapist would come up with a diagnosis of the problem.  Cognitive psychologists help someone defeat negative thinking by training that individual to think in more positive, healthy ways.  They believe that the source of the problem is the cognition of an individual.  If you change the thought pattern, the solution is already found.  However, behavioral psychologists focus only on the behavioral patterns of the problemed individuals.  Treatment options are systematic desensitization and aversive conditioning.  In my opinion, an eclectic approach is the best route for any individual.  It has a mix of everything; therefore, a balanced perspective can help in different ways.

May 1, 2011 at 9:24 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Ed Jankowski
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Posts: 8

Lanie Ogram at May 1, 2011 at 9:08 PM

Lanie Ogram.

A humanistic psychologist would treat a client by focusing on the present and the future and on conscious thoughts. They would also promote one's health and growth rather than curing their illness. While a psychoanalytical psychologist would focus on the patient's unconcious thoughts and dreams and try to bring repressed feelings to conscious awareness. Cognitive therapists would treat disorders by reversing the clients' catastrophic beliefs about themselves, their situations and their furures. While a behaviorial therapist would view maladaptive symptoms as learned behaviors and try to replace them with constructive behaviors. I think if someone suffered from anxiety disorder, the best therapy would be psychoanalytical therapy because if they are able to understand the unconsciousness, they may be able to have a better chance in understanding the consciousness.

I agree with almost everything you put down.  The psychoanalytic versus humanistic perspective was right on the money.  The same goes for cognitive versus behavioral.  However, in my opinion, an eclectic approach would be the best way to help someone.  It enables psychologists to use a wide variety of approaches, in order to make plans customized to the patient's small, or wide variety of problems.

May 1, 2011 at 9:32 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Devin McDuffie
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Posts: 4

The main issue between humanistic and psychoanalytic therapists would be the location of the trigger for the condition being treated.  The psychoanalytic therapist is going to look for these triggers in the sub concious or even the "id", while the humanist would be more focused on the noticable emotional cues to dissect the problem being treated, and assist the patient by adjusting their emotional state so that they feel accepted and able to talk about the issue at hand.  Behaviourists (sorry, I spell OLD SCHOOL) would have an issue trying to look at a mental cause to the deliema, because you can't monitor the brain's physical behaviour.  A Cognitive therapist is by and large going to say it has something to do with the thought processes of the patient, and that it needs to be a case of "mind-over-matter" to find the solution.  An ecclectic cognitive and psychoanalytic approach to therapy is, in my opinion, the safest and most efficient way to go.  this way, the inner workings of the patients psyche can be accessed, allowing better understanding of the problem, allowing for the most efficient means of curing the patient. 

--

Devin McDuffie

May 1, 2011 at 9:36 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Devin McDuffie
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Posts: 4

Briana Jamieson at May 1, 2011 at 6:49 PM

Joy at May 1, 2011 at 12:17 PM

Joy Kuhaneck:

The main discrepancies a humanistic psychologist would have with a psychoanalytic psychologist would be the matter of conscious and unconscious thought. The humanistic approach focuses just on the patients current conscious feelings and having the patient take on the responsibility for personal growth, self-actualization. On the other hand the psychoanalytic psychologist focuses on unconscious urges and tries to make the patient recognize these urges, which often come from past traumatic events. The main problem a cognitive therapist would have with a behavioral therapist is that the behavioral therapist doesn’t look at the underlying cause of how the patient acts and just temporarily fixes the behavior by not taking into account the cognitive processes of the patient. If a person as suffering from an anxiety disorder I think that an eclectic approach therapy would be best. The eclectic approach is a therapy in which, depending on the persons problems, techniques are used from various forms of therapy.

I wrote the same thing but i didn't consider an eclectic approach therapy. Good thinking :)

I feel the same way, though I have a higher value on cognitive and psychoanalytic solutions for the simple idea that the mind is often the trigger for most of our phobias and anxiety.  This was a very good summary =)

May 1, 2011 at 9:39 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Drew
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Posts: 8

Humanistic psychologists focus more on  the patients' mood or emotional state at the presnt time and are more geared towards focusing on the conciense mind. Psychoanalytical psychologists take the approach of getting the patient to look within to their unconcious for the reasons as to why they behave a certain way. It could be speculated that this type of psychology is inhibited by an individual's repression of certain memories or inaccurate recall.  Cognitive therapists' would most likely criticise behaviorsit therapists for not fully adressing the issue and cause of the problem but rather just try to fix it and move on. Personally, i believe that can not make any true progress until you adress the issue. Once you do that, you may truley move on and to moevon is to grow. That being said I would have to say that I believe a cognitive therapist's approach to treatment would be the best.

May 1, 2011 at 11:08 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Drew
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Posts: 8

Christina Coffee at April 4, 2011 at 3:58 PM

Christina Coffee Per. 4

.

A humanistic psychologist focuses on the patient’s current emotions and feelings. They attempt to help the patient take responsibility in their own growth throughout their treatment. Psychologist Carl Rogers practiced active listening to express with them acceptance, understanding, meanings, values, and self-actualization. A Psychoanalytical psychologist tries to help the patients gain awareness of the unconscious cause of their disorders and the uncomfortable feelings associated with it. Psychoanalytical psychologist use free association (the mental process in which a picture or word may convey another without logical or conscious connections) and dream analysis (assigning dreams meanings) to assess the patient’s problem. The traditional type of psychological therapy is greatly criticized for assuming the patient is displaying repression (holding back and blocking a memory from being brought to the conscious mind). Also this type of therapy is expensive. A humanistic psychologist would argue that the psychoanalytical psychologist is only focusing on and bringing back those unpleasant memories from the patient’s past rather than helping them over come the current problems it has brought to them.A cognitive therapist bases their treatment on the fact that the way we think about events or actions affects the way we feel emotionally. This type of therapy focuses more on present events. A behavior therapist would attempt to help the patient by extinguishing the abnormal behavior and reinforcing the desired behavior. A behavior therapist does not try to discover the origins of the abnormal behavior. A cognitive therapist trying to help a mentally disordered patient would criticize a behavior therapist because a behavior therapist does not believe that self-awareness will help the patient get better. If a person was suffering from one of the anxiety disorders the type of therapy that I would find the most beneficial to them would have to be behavior therapy. I feel this way because when suffering from an anxiety attack I believe that it would be much more helpful if I had a behavior modification technique that would be able to change my mood around in that situation. Also with behavior therapy a therapistcould use counter conditioning which is taking the stimulus that triggers the fear and placing it with a new response that is contradictory to fear. I think that it would be very help to have when suffering from an anxiety disorder.

 

 


Drew Purkey- Congrats Christina. You really did your homework on this one. I would find it hard to believe anyone could have said it better but I agree with everythingyou said 100%.


May 1, 2011 at 11:10 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Caitlyn Zona
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Posts: 4

In psychology there are different perspectives that briefly give an idea of each psychologist's main beliefs and what areas of interests that the psychologist looks at. A humanistic psychologist takes a holistic approach to one's values, emotions, potential, self-actualization, etc. The psychologist would also want to focus on current emotions rather than past problems. The humanistic psychologists also use self-centered therapy in order to have the patient speak and realize the true issues. On the opposite side of the scale, are psychoanalytic psychologists. Psychoanalytical psychologists deal with unsolved behaviors or thoughts and past experiences. Repression is a main issue in the psychoanalytical perspective. The psychologist must dig at the patient to bring memories to the conscious awareness in order to realize true issues. The main criticism between cognitive and behavioral psychologists is that cognitive psychologists argue that behaviorists do not actively treat the reason the patient is acting the way he/she is. The cognitive psychologists focuses so much on what the patient is thinking and why the actions are occurring, it is shocking to look at the behavioral psychologists and see the main cause of the behavior not being treated. For treatment of an anxiety disorder, I would use an eclectic approach focusing on biological and cognitive therapies. I have always been a big believer that much of a person's thoughts and characteristics can be linked to genetics and family but the person's thoughts about the situation can also be a huge influence.

May 2, 2011 at 4:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Caitlyn Zona
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Posts: 4

Kathleen Smith at April 20, 2011 at 7:46 PM

A Humanistic psychologist focus purly on the clients' counscious feelings and for the client to take responsibility in their own personal growth. Psychoanalytical psychologists believe in everything to be unconscious. The main discrepancies that these two psychologists may have is the difference between conscious and unconscious. Humanistic would approach a client by listening and expressing acceptance that the client may not receive from another person. But on the other hand a psychoanalytical psychologist would treat everything unconscious such as dreams and bring up regressed feelings. Cognitive therapists train people to look at themselves in new, positive ways while they might criticize Behavioral therapists because Behaviorists wouldn't try to find the origin of the problem but try to make the client become desencitized to the problem all together. The treatment that would be most effective therapy would be Cognitive therapy. A person should try to change their thinking of the situation and handle it by seeing the problem in new light. Cognitive therapy would not be a sense in the client "running away" from the problem, but facing it head-on and solving it before the problem developes into something more.

Kathleen Smith

I agree with you in many ways Kathleen! Your insight and examples really add to your definitions and make your point so much clearer.  While some of the defintions were not long in length, you really showed your knowledge because it was straight to the point and correct. 

May 2, 2011 at 4:20 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Brandy Bigbie
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Posts: 3

A discrepancy between a Humanistic psychologist and a Psychoanalytic psychologist regarding treatment and therapy is the difference of concious and unconcious thought. A Humanistic psychologist focuses on the patient's view of themself and help them to reach their full potential through overcoming their problems. A Psychoanalytic psychologist focuses on unconsious urges, unsolved, and often unresolved childhood problems or trauma. A Cognitive psychologist would criticize a Behavior therapist's concept of observing the patient's behavior instead of focusig on the patient's thought. A cognitive psychologist would focus on the thought of a patient with a mental disorder rather than simply observe their behavior. If a patiet suffered from an anxiety disorder, I believe that a Congitive psychologist would be the best form of therapy because it would focus on the thought processes of the patient. Therefore the therapist could discover a means for the cause of the anxiety, thus solving the patient's disorder.

May 2, 2011 at 9:54 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Shelby Adams
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Posts: 10

The psychoanalytic perspective  focuses on underlying unconsious and consious thought , events from childhood, and long- repressed feelings. Humanistic therapy focuses on reaching a persons full potenital in the now : not in the past only revising the future. Behavior therapy attempts to focus on the now by sttempting to counter condition unwanted thoughts and feelings , most of the time using the most popular method Systematic Desentization : which is counter conditioning. Cognitive Therapy would relate to humantic therapy , they aim to change present thinking to repress/ destroy harmful thoughts of the past.

May 2, 2011 at 9:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Shelby Adams
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Posts: 10

Joy at May 1, 2011 at 12:17 PM

Joy Kuhaneck:

The main discrepancies a humanistic psychologist would have with a psychoanalytic psychologist would be the matter of conscious and unconscious thought. The humanistic approach focuses just on the patients current conscious feelings and having the patient take on the responsibility for personal growth, self-actualization. On the other hand the psychoanalytic psychologist focuses on unconscious urges and tries to make the patient recognize these urges, which often come from past traumatic events. The main problem a cognitive therapist would have with a behavioral therapist is that the behavioral therapist doesn’t look at the underlying cause of how the patient acts and just temporarily fixes the behavior by not taking into account the cognitive processes of the patient. If a person as suffering from an anxiety disorder I think that an eclectic approach therapy would be best. The eclectic approach is a therapy in which, depending on the persons problems, techniques are used from various forms of therapy.

I agree with "The main problem a cognitive therapist would have with a behavioral therapist is that the behavioral therapist doesn’t look at the underlying cause of how the patient acts and just temporarily fixes the behavior by not taking into account the cognitive processes of the patient." i can see how behavioral therapy may be temporary and does not look into the past to fix an underlying motive. We may be able to only temporarly repress a pressing thought but by using a cognitive approach we would look back into unconcious motives of the past and diminsh that thought.

May 2, 2011 at 10:04 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Brandy Bigbie
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Posts: 3

Lanie Ogram at May 1, 2011 at 9:08 PM

Lanie Ogram.

A humanistic psychologist would treat a client by focusing on the present and the future and on conscious thoughts. They would also promote one's health and growth rather than curing their illness. While a psychoanalytical psychologist would focus on the patient's unconcious thoughts and dreams and try to bring repressed feelings to conscious awareness. Cognitive therapists would treat disorders by reversing the clients' catastrophic beliefs about themselves, their situations and their furures. While a behaviorial therapist would view maladaptive symptoms as learned behaviors and try to replace them with constructive behaviors. I think if someone suffered from anxiety disorder, the best therapy would be psychoanalytical therapy because if they are able to understand the unconsciousness, they may be able to have a better chance in understanding the consciousness.

I completely agree with your discrepancy between a humanistic and psychoanalytic psychologist because the main difference is conscious and unconscious thought. But don't forget that a psychoanalytic psychologist would also bring into consideration the patient's unresolved childhood experiences. I also agree that a cognitive psychologist focuses on the patient's beliefs and thoughts. I believe that many different psychologist could help treat a patient suffering from an anxiety disorder, including a cognitive psychologist because they would focus on the patient's thoughts, which may be the cause of their anxiety.

May 2, 2011 at 10:05 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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